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complete noob - need help

Discussion in 'New Riders and Riding Tips' at netrider.net.au started by Matt GO!!!!!!!, May 10, 2007.

  1. Hey i have a lot of questions can people please help, I don't know much about bikes, these may seem like silly trivial questions to a lot of people....


    1. I am really considering buying this bike it's a 150cc (I need less than 250cc as im going to be on learners :cry: )




    2001 HONDA NSR150

    Type Speedway Racers
    Make HONDA
    Model NSR150
    Series SP SPORTS
    Year 2001
    Capacity (cc) 150
    kms 18,326
    Price $3,490
    Reference Code DPLBi38690
    Stock Number 802044
    VIN 6H6NS15041V000174
    Registration No. YH729


    would a 150cc have enough power and be safe enough, easy to use, reliable etc for a learner??

    2. My previous riding experience is a 50cc scooter at the coast during schoolies (I hired it). It was automatic of course. Is riding a real manual bike difficult?? How long would it take me learn the basics of gears and clutch?

    3. Is motobike riding really that dangerous??? Everyone I ask says its dangerous and should be avoided and say that "You will die Matthew". I rode my 50cc at coast no troubles. What makes riding dangerous??? If you look out for cars (cagers???) what can go wrong?

    4. On learners do you need someone with you at all times??? On the Government site for QLD it states "You may only be taught by someone who holds an open licence"

    Does that mean only opens can give me advice??? OR does it mean an open rider must accompany me at all times??

    5. Does a bike require lots of maintenence? I've read that every week you must check oil and chain and so on? What's the most important things to maintain and check??

    I believe thats all for now.... I did have other questions but forgot them

    Thanks in advance for helping me ladies and gentlmen! :LOL:
     
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  2. Hi Matt, welcome to Netrider. There's heaps of info on here and you'll find alot of the answers to your questions just be reading through the posts.

    Spend some time doing searches on different subjects and read through everything you come across... you'll be surprised how much you pick up.

    I'm not up on QLD reg's, but are you sure you need to ride a bike that is less than 250cc? That's not the case here in Vic. Maybe some of the QLD'rs can answer that one for you.

    As far as being taught by someone who holds an open licence, I'm fairly certain that you need to be actually accompanied by the open licence holder while on the road. And regarding your question about safety on a motorbike, once again try the search feature. There's tons of stuff on here about the pro's and con's of riding.

    There'll be more posts coming to help you out, so keep checking in :wink:

    :grin:
     
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  3. ok thanks mate :LOL:

    Yes in QLD for Learners you MUST have a bike that is equal or less than 250cc

    I am 100%sure of this just wondering if the 150 Honda was suitable :?
     
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  4. Oh OK, sorry. I thought you were saying you were restricted from riding a 250cc and that's why you were looking at the NSR150.



    :cool:
     
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  5. Welcome to NR Matt Go :)

    As fuzzy suggested, if you search chances are you shall find :LOL:

    Well its an upgrade in power from the scooter you were using but it will depend on how and what sort of riding you intend to do (as well as your body weight) if you feel it will have enough go for you.

    It is more complex than riding a scooter. All four body parts (arms & legs) are responsible for different features of the bike and so for some it can take some time co-ordinating those movements.

    Yes it can be

    You and everything around you, including weather.

    Plenty, they may not see you.

    Tyres, oil, chain, general condition ie: hoses and your bank balance!
     
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  6. Welcome Matty.

    Don't even worry about what bike you should get.

    No offence mate, but those type of questions tells me if you are that ignorant
    about motorcycling its best you spend much time reading/researching
    before making the decision to purchase a bike, let alone which one.

    Otherwise your chances of ending up as roadkill is going to be high.
     
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  7. +1

    1. would a 150cc have enough power and be safe enough, easy to use, reliable etc for a learner??
    enough power yes. safe enough? depends on your riding. easy to use? not really, ask chani, she has an NSR 150. Basically it's a high maintenance bike that likes lots of revs. if you putter around on it you are likely to foul up the plugs.

    2. My previous riding experience is a 50cc scooter at the coast during schoolies (I hired it). It was automatic of course. Is riding a real manual bike difficult?? How long would it take me learn the basics of gears and clutch?
    Scoots are pretty easy to ride, just jump on and off ya go. take a little more learning to get the hang of the gear shifts on a manual bike. I'd say, probably 2 hours of tutoring and practice, to get the hang of taking off, stopping and changin gears up and down. That being said it would take you months before you had any fun on an NSR 150.

    3. Is motobike riding really that dangerous??? Everyone I ask says its dangerous and should be avoided and say that "You will die Matthew". I rode my 50cc at coast no troubles. What makes riding dangerous??? If you look out for cars (cagers???) what can go wrong?
    Short answer YES. you've probably not had much driving experience at 17, looking out for cars is one thing, but I remember driving on my P's and there were so many distractions on the road to take my focus away. what can go wrong? the worst is you could die. be stuck in hospital for a long time. break the hearts of those that care about you.

    4. On learners do you need someone with you at all times??? On the Government site for QLD it states "You may only be taught by someone who holds an open licence"
    Not sure about QLD reg's but pretty sure that you will need someone to ride with you at all times to get your L's.


    5. Does a bike require lots of maintenence? I've read that every week you must check oil and chain and so on? What's the most important things to maintain and check??

    An older bike will require more maintenance, a 2 stroke will need a top end rebuild every 5,000 - 10,000 km (i could be wrong) depends how you ride it. Any bike will require at least a weekly check on your tyres, chain and oil, but they're pretty basic to do yourself.

    Some important questions you have not raised but may be on your mind... what does it cost to insure a fully faired race replica bike as a 17 year with no driving history? How much would protective gear cost to get me fully set up and on the road? Is it too hot to ride in full gear all the time up in QLD?

    Finally I do agree with MG your ingnorance is a hurdle at the moment but the information is on here somewhere, take some time to do the research and you'll get lots of opinions on just about every question you've asked. I've basically given you what I've read and herad from here when I first considered a bike. At least you are asking some questions rather than going out and spending all your hard earn on a bike without being informed. Remember all opinions expressed on here are just that, opinions. If you think they are helpful to you consider them, if you think they are BS then leave them be.

    Ooh and welcome to the forums.
     
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  8. thanks so much for the help guys, yeah i need to learn just a little bit more :LOL: . I would rather be informed and knowledglible about that to do first then jump in the deep end. Thanks again for the good advice
     
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  9. dont get an NSR150 unless u are mechanicaly able. While they are very simple to repair rebuild it is still something very duanting for most people and requires ur attention alot more.

    Grab a 250 in good nick and u cant go wrong
     
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  10. In all honesty, if you've never riden a motorbike I would suggest not getting a NSR.

    They are awesome little bikes.

    Having said that the reason I got mine was because having riden dirt bikes most my life, I couldn't get my head around starting a bike without a kick on it, it was too weird.

    It's a shit bike for city riding, or stop start riding. You need to rev the guts out of it constantly, otherwise, as im.on.it said, you will foul the plugs up. Which is annoying the first few times it happens, once you get used to what happens & how to fix it, it's not so bad.

    Due to the constant high revs, it chews through fuel.

    It's got alot of guts for a one fiddy too.

    It does require alot of attention. But not heaps, no more than any other bike. However, mine has alot less ks on it. Around 14,000 less.

    At the end of the day it is a good little bike. But if you're not used to having to deal with all the stuff that comes with it, it'll drive you mental.

    Anything else you want to know just ask :)
     
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  11. I would suggest not getting that 150. Get a 250 4 stroke. 2 stroke motors require more maintenance.
    Different position, gears, and using your body more. Ive always thought that if you can ride a push bike well, then you can learn to ride a motorbike. Also being able to drive a car will give you a basic understanding of gears.
    What can go wrong is the one time that you might miss something and get cleaned up. You can pay attention to all the cagers in the world, but very few of them will pay attention to you. When you go on the road you are signing a personal disclosure saying "I entrust my life to everyone else on the road"
    The queensland system is this:
    No pre-learners.
    Learners is a 5 question quiz.
    On your learners you can ride a motorbike 250cc and under WHILST under instruction from someone who has their opens for 3 years.Soon enough you will have to have a cage license for 6 months before gettng your learners.
    P's can be done through a QRIDE accredited training organisation, which is a one day or weekend course (depending on experience).
    You will have RE P's which you are still restricted, but you can ride alone.
    After a year you can re-do the QRIDE course to obtain a R P's, which is an unrestricted license, but you still need to be no BAC and only 4 points on your license.
    After 3 years of your R P's, or RE P's you get your R/E O license, which is a complete/restricted open license.
    Short answer yes, long answer is not much more then a car should be maintained. However less people actually maintain their car. The most important thing to maintain on a bike is.......everything. It is your life you are putting on the line, it is more dangerous to ride a motorbike then it is to drive a car, keep your bike running 100% for the best chance not to get stuck in a wobbly situation.


    Depends where you are in QLD, there will probably be a netrider near you that would happily begin to teach you how to ride a motorcycle. Also, CT110 (postie bikes) i believe have gears and an automatic clutch, so its a stepping stone if you have real difficulty.

    PS I won't tell you to give up if you are having great difficulty, but i hope you realize that it can be like skydiving, if you haven't got some knack for it, you could end up in a sticky situation with no decent prospect.
     
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  12. The NSR150SP is a great bike. Japanese engine .

    Handles rider errors quite well (weighs only ~150kg) and has a great gearbox, although 1st gear is a little steep.

    Had mine now for nearly a month, hasn't skipped a beat and starts first time on an alright day, 20 - 30 C.

    Once you hit powerband from 7k - 13k it goes like a rocket.

    Has enough torque to take off in 2nd gear, although you'd likely burn the clutch.

    I'd buy one anyday. :grin:
     
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  13. I would tend to argree to get a 250cc 4 stroke than a 150cc 2 stroke. I have ridden the NSR150(Only for a short while in a enclosed area) before my CBR250. I found (as said before) NSR need lots of revs to get going. As for the looks and feel of both bikes are very similar. The NSR is lighter than CBR but I didnt have a chance to test the power of the NSR.
     
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  14. I'd say u'd be better off with a 250cc. NSR is a bit zippy and you will need a bit more clutch control to begin with to keep things under control. If you let it go in too high a gear it will almost throw u over the front handle bars.

    You will find a 250 easier to handle, and probably a better step towards a bigger bike. A scooter is a completely different bike. No gears, no clutch, different position, a lot different power. But it's good road experience to have none the less.

    Do a search for the common 250's, there's heaps of info with comparisons/comments.
     
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  15. Hmm...

    I have never experienced anything close to what you mention, however, when your going too fast and engage 1st you can spin the rear wheel... :grin:

    It only does what you want it to... take it easy dont expect to be a Mick Doohan the first time you ride... small steps at a time, learn about the bike's capabilities and your capabilities and build up as you go, i.e. practice.

    But if your gonna buy a sportier bike in the long run, why not buy one now and take good care of it... :p
     
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  16. Unless you grew up riding trail bikes don't even contemplate a 2stroke such as the NSR. The 150 is underpowered compared to the 250 NSR RS RGV etc.. but still requires you to rev the crap out of it. If you haven't ridden much you won't be able to give it what it wants. You need a 250 4stroke. Naked bikes will be cheaper to insure and the twins are generally cheaper to insure than the 4cylinder bikes. Look for the CB, VTR, ZZR, GPX, GSX, GN, if you want cheap to insure. The balius, hornet, bandit and zeal will be slightly more expensive to insure and the CBR or ZXR will probably cost the value of the bike yearly at your age. :)

    Yes, riding can be as dangerous as they say. It's also a hell of a lot of fun so don't discount it if you want to try. Most of the danger can only be reduced with experience, knowledge, riding skill (practice) and attitude. In the meantime rely on attitude and willingness to learn, and add about $1500 minimum worth of protective gear to the mix (in qld you probably want dri-mesh jacket and kevlar lined jeans with good riding boots and summer gloves, then buy wets to put on over the top). :)

    As others have said, don't rush into it. The more you know, the better prepared you'll be. This site (as with most bike sites) have new riders and tips forums. Read as much as you can and learn before you buy. The mistakes and questions of others will save you thousands of dollars and weeks of stress. :)

    Good luck and happy riding. :grin:


    Note: If all else is forgotten just remember this..., shiny side up, rubber side down. :)

    Edit: I haven't ridden one yet but have had a good look and feel I should mention the CBR 125. If you can afford it ($3990 new) it looks the goods and the cheap price means cheap insurance despite the fairings. :) If you're a big fella though I wouldn't bother cause a 4stroke 125 wont have enough balls to get you moving, but for the average joe (or particularly littler people) it should do well over 100 with no drama. :)
     
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  17. $3990 YOURE JOKING RIGHT!!! :shock:

    My NSR is for sale.... :shock:

    If only ORC's and stamp duty were included... :LOL:
     
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  18. Nope. :)
    click
     
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  19. My brother got his L's and is looking a a few 250cc 4-strokes.

    But he's worried the ORC's will push it up to $5k+ :?

    Any thoughts?
     
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