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Featured VIC Changing lanes in an intersection

Discussion in 'Politics, Laws, Government & Insurance' started by robsalvv, May 18, 2015.

  1. I've had a quick look at the road safety regs for Victoria - the rule isn't leaping out at me. This is one of the road rules that a filtering rider can be done for when they take off from the lights and slot into one lane or the other while riding through the intersection.

    • Informative Informative x 1
  2. I've always been under the impression its more of an expectation like "dont change lanes in a roundabout" which can be classed as careless driving.
    Regardless its stupid as you should be focused on the risks of intersections themselves not adding merging into the game aswell.
    • Agree Agree x 1
  3. Devil is correct.

    A driver must not change lanes over a single continuous lane line, including those approaching traffic signals. The solid lane line(s) continue through the intersection.

    Regulation 147 and 148.

    • Informative Informative x 2
  4. He didn't, he moved in the intersection where there were no marked lanes hence no lines to cross over. Unless you are suggesting the law says the lanes continue through the intersection even if not marked which the examples you linked to don't seem to state.
  5. #5 RRdevil, May 19, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: May 19, 2015
    It is accepted that when there are no lines in an intersection that those immediately preceding are considered to continue through. Hence why when I watched the video again I retracted my comment as it is broken up to the intersection and solid after therefore considered broken through the intersection

    She made a mistake. When people make a mistake it is common for them to initially refuse to accept they made a mistake. These kind of things happen every day and not just to motorcyclists but semi trailers as well. Everyone makes mistakes
    • Like Like x 2
    • Agree Agree x 2
  6. I get that is what is implied in Justus' post however it isn't evident in the legal links he posted. I'd be interested to see the evidence of the law that supports that implication for future reference.
  7. Bit of confusion all round here. I don't think anyone is claiming it's isn't illegal to cross an unbroken line.

    I think someone claimed the rider was in the wrong to change lanes in the middle of an intersection. We had this a few weeks ago and nobody could prove it was.

    Regardless, I think the incident in the OP is a pretty serious one. If someone is driving around being that unaware of their surrundings and blatantly crossing unbroken lines like that (and putting others in danger), then I think this incident does warrant the attention of the Police.

    You see similar incidents all the time, but this one goes that much further.

    It crosses a line (sorry).
  8. #8 Mcsenna, May 19, 2015
    Last edited: May 19, 2015
    Devil is doing the same as you, quoting what he believes to be the law without any evidence to support it.
    No one has been able to show me a road rule which confirms that, this is what I keep saying, you keep reiterating the same thing without giving any evidence.
    Saying something is implied or deemed means little to me. I want to see the road rule which supports that and I can't find one. At this time neither have you.
    Everyone knows a driver must not change lanes over a single continuous line, I don't need you to keep telling me that. I'll say it again, someone show me where in the road rules it says these lines are deemed to continue into the intersection even if not marked.
    I'm not saying it doesn't exist but I can't find it, can anyone ?

    Edit: I'll go one further, I've had a reasonably thorough read of Australian Road Rules 1.9.2014 in particular Part 11, Division 4. parts of which were linked by Justus and nowhere does it say anything about lines deemed to continue through an intersection.
    If you think about it further there are some good reasons to be able to move from one side of the road to the other in an intersection without breaking the law relating to crossing a single line, "deemed" to exist or not.
  9. I can't link to the law only that which I was taught when I did my license test over 18 years ago. I thought it was common knowledge. But is this your mod arsehole coming out mcsenna? You've had an issue with me for a long time. Tell the audience what it is
  10. mmm im guna watch this thread
    • Like Like x 2
    • Winner Winner x 1
  11. RRdevilRRdevil
    The document that you have taken this extract from... is it road rules or is it advice to avoid collisions?
    I could only find the latter for NSW
  12. The stuff you are quoting is road safety material, not law excerpts so it's irrelevant to my question.
    That's fine I will find the answer from a reliable source.
    As for the rest of that gibberish, I have no interest in you at all apart from deleting your double post, service with a smile.
    • Like Like x 1
  13. ^ same question for me.

    I just got some advice from a traffic law specialist who states that it is not illegal to change lanes through an intersection. lol

    Now I really wanna know what is the truth! lol

    I think this derail deserves it's own thread... will do that modding later.
  14. The ability to change lanes or not is indicated by the linemarking in the first instance.

    There is no line marking in intersections other than roundabouts and you could change lanes if you were the only vehicle present but read the sections about changing into the path of another vehicle again - when there is no line marking those will apply and it is generally held that there are enough vehicles present to prevent lane changes.

    Why don't we mark intersections (in case you wanted to know) - because the lines wear too quickly.

    Roundabouts should be marked with a series of continuous unbroken lines which you can't cross - the lines stop near the exits etc to allow you to cross them to enter and exit the roundabout.
    • Disagree Disagree x 1
  15. Exactly, despite the pedantics of some in this thread the question remains.
    Think about the number of times you see people swapping from one side to another in an intersection when the cars in front stop leaving them stranded in the middle. Are they breaking the law ? If so and they stay there blocking the intersection are they then not breaking the law ?
  16. Jumping in on the 'common knowledge you can't change lanes in an intersection' thing, I will observe that I understood it to be a rule also, but now that I think about it it may simply have been a 'not a great idea to do that' rather than a 'bang that's a traffic infringement'. I can't say if I know if it as a law though.

    I will say that my wife constantly berates me for 'changing lanes in the intersection' so clearly she thinks it's a law. I personally consider it to be one of those laws - if it is a law - best ignored. After all, I learnt to drive in Queensland in the 1980s - back then we didn't even know how to do roundabouts right (and still don't).
  17. Can't answer with any real link for credit *lazy more than anything* but you're not meant to enter an intersection if you're not able to finish crossing it. ie: if you start crossing at a green and it's red before you're done crossing, it's a no-no.... take Flinders & Elizabeth (or any other intersection in CBD) at any point of the day for example.
  18. I quizzed the expert about the idea of the solid dividing line leading up to a controlled intersection being projected forward / imagined into the intersection therefore prohibiting changing of lanes through intersection, but he said "whaaat?".

    I swear I thought it was a road rule, but I can't find the rule and one expert thinks it's baloney... so I have to call it debunked.
  19. This is why I challenge things people say are accepted without any basis of fact.
    • Agree Agree x 1