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Buy a second hand bike in QLD?

Discussion in 'General Motorcycling Discussion' started by MattiasL, Jun 24, 2012.

  1. Hi I am new on this forum and have been in Australia for 1 year now and I am going to buy a second hand motorbike to commute to work and Uni, I have been riding bikes in Sweden for many years.

    I would like some help regarding registration and safety certificate questions when buying a second hand motorbike in QLD, I have spent a long time trying to figure out the information on the Queensland transport homepage but I cannot get my head around it.

    I was thinking to buy an unregistered motorbike for around $1500 and make it roadworthy, is this unwise? I have read on different forums that it is difficult and expensive to register an unregistered motorbike? And I cannot find much information on QLD transport page.

    I used to repair and thinker with my bikes in Sweden so I am quite confident in getting a bike roadworthy.

    Hope you can help me with information because I want to get back on the road and also do some travelling and discover this beautiful country.



  2. It isn't difficult to get a safety certificate. Before you buy the bike, do a REVS check on it to make sure the bike isn't stolen or money owed on it.
    Then buy the bike, prep/fix the bike so it is roadworthy, then find out who does safety certificates for bikes in you local area and present the bike to them. They will go over the bike and either give you a certificate, or give you a list of further items that needs replacing or repairing.
    Once it passes, you will need to present the certificate plus the purchasing information from the seller in the form of a receipt, to prove ownership, along with enough ID to establish your identity.
    The dept of transport will process it, working out how much stamp duty, rego and third party property you owe them. You then pay them the figure to cover those things and they will hand you over a licence plate. At that point the bike is now registered in your name. Once you attach the plate you are good to go.
  3. Thank you so much!

    You made it very easy to understand.

    When you got the safety certificate do you need to bring the bike to QLD road or is it enough with all the paperwork? as the bike unregistered It can be driven.
  4. Most states will allow you to ride to the inspection or to a road worthy check. The QLD procedure is HERE
  5. I have purchased both a car and a bike unregistered in the last 5 years and did not have to present either to the dept of transport. I have heard of other people having to though. Take it with you and it saves another trip if they do want to see it. Just take the appropriate hardware and tools to attach the plate, so you can go on a long ride once you leave!
  6. If I for example find a great second hand motorbike in NSW is it easy to register it in QLD or will I have to deal with complicated paperwork etc?
  7. I'm not entirely sure if it's the same for bikes, but I bought a NSW registered car whilst in QLD, and they treated it as an unregistered car at the Dept of Transport.

    i.e. I bought the car, got a signed letter from the previous owner advising transfer of ownership (I did call and check beforehand what information needs to be on this letter for QLD to accept it as proof of ownership), and then got the roadworthy check done on the car and took it all in to get registered.

    I remember it being a moderately painful process, but then isn't that always the case when dealing with a roads/transport authority?
  8. No more taperwork than an unregistered bike from QLD would be. Buy the bike unregistered ( you cant transfer the rego into qld anyway unless it was registered to you in NSW first), then just follow the above.

    I did this 12 months ago with my current ride. Purchased it on bikesales out of Sydney, had it freighted up and went about getting a safety certificate and registered and changed over into my name.
    As mentioned earlier, just make sure the bike isn't stolen or has a debt against it. Make sure you also get copies of a reciept from the seller and also some old rego papers if purchasing from interstate.
    NSW sellers tend to supply these anyway as on the back of the paperwork is the form work to sell the vehicle, so thats all sweet.
    If you know the system, it isn't that painful. The most painful bit is waiting at the Dept or Transport with your ticket in hand!
  9. Thanks for your help, I really appreciate it, everything is slowly coming together now how it works over here:)
  10. No worries.
    Of course the game changes between states too, so don't get the idea you have it all sorted and then move to Sydney or Melbourne!:eek:
  11. Gday Mattias

    I've bought several cheap unrego'd bikes in the past, and have just bought another. The responses above have pretty much covered the process, but I thought I'd add my experiences.

    So my recent purchase was an unregistered 99 sv650 for $1500 (paid too much, but that's another story)

    1. Getting it home.
    Strictly speaking, you're only allowed to ride from the place of purchase to an inspection station. If you want to take it home first, you have to have it towed (within Brisbane, about $50. Gary's Motorcycle Towing is good) or get the seller to deliver. In practice, if its rideable and has plates I've just ridden it home. You can always say you're going to an inspection station if you're pulled over.

    2. Repairing (the fun bit)
    Below is a rough guide of things that a checked for rego. Not a complete list.
    a. Obvious things to check
    1 Tyres - not below the wear marks
    2 Chain and sprockets - not worn. Had to replace on the Sv,
    3 Bearings - Wheels, head stem, swingarm etc. SV needed front wheels and stem, plus cush drive rubbers.
    4 Brakes - pads ok and discs above minimum thickness
    5 Lights, indicators and horn all working
    6 Instruments working. The SV needed a speedo drive.
    b. Non-obvious things to check
    1. Seats - a tear in the seat cover is a rego fail, but a bit of cloth tape will get it passed.
    2. Cracked fairings - depending on how picky they are, they can know you back if the fairings are cracked or don' fit properly

    Cost me $500 or so for parts.

    3. Compulsory Third Party Insurance
    - You need a CTP slip before you ride to the inspection station. This means if you're going straight from picking it up to an inspection station, you need to organise this before you pick it up. Can be done over the phone with any of the insurance companies - all you need is the VIN number of the motorcycle. Costs about $260, or $80 if the bike has a single seat modification plate (if the seller doesn't mention it, it doesn't have one)

    4. Inspection
    Take it to an inspection station. Most motorcycle service stations will do them for around $50, otherwise if you're in Brisbane you can ring up Brian Harper of Motorcycle Roadworthys and he will come to you and do one for around $110, depending on where you are.

    5. Rego
    Take your licence, the receipt the seller gave you, the Safety Certificate (roadworthy inspection form) and a filled out registration application form to your local QLD Transprot office. Wait. Wait some more. Yep, more waiting. Pay registration, fees, fees and fees (about $220 all up for 12 months). Attach rego label and shiny new plate to bike. Go for a celebratory ride through the gold coast hinterland.

    So my $1500 sv650 will have cost me around $2600 by the time its on the road, assuming no nasty surprises. Equivalent to buying a $2500 bike with rego and a safety cert.

    By comparison, my $1200 VFR750F owed my a bit over $3000 by the time it was on the road. I also bough a CB900RR for $900. You don't want to know how much I have sunk into that...

    Hope that helps. Sorry for the long winded response.
  12. Thanks heaps!