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WA Boom Tubes, HP + or - & Their Legality

Discussion in 'Politics, Laws, Government & Insurance' at netrider.net.au started by Beercules, Oct 21, 2012.

  1. #1 Beercules, Oct 21, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 13, 2015
    hiya guy's after googling away for a couple days & coming up with absolutely jack to do with Boom Tubes specific to the Ducati Monster 1100 EVO, this might not be the right place to ask but i'm going out on a limb here & asking anyway

    right i know you've probably gotten this before but i've looked at alot of threads out there & their all half finished so i'm asking do Boom Tubes actually hurt or increase the performance of the bike ? as in are there any HP gains or losses with the addition of these pipes obviously they shave some weight off the bike so that's a + in term's of power to weight ratio



    now the big question on my mind is are they *legal* in Australia ? more specifically *Western Australia* i've looked all over every friggen australian department of transportation site to figure out what's legal & what isn't on aftermarket exhausts & it's all on car's there's dick on motorcycles so i'm hoping somebody out there knows something i don't

    for people that don't know what i'm taking about, here's a few links

    [media=youtube]fEgo3gG2DE4[/media]

    http://motocreations.com/

    their website is a bit of a mess
     
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  2. general idea is that aftermarket pipes are usually frowned upon by the authorities and every time you take the bike in for roadworthy they'll expect pictures or fitted standard pipe so make sure you keep those handy just in case. As far as power increase, the likelyhood is that you may get a couple of HP out of it as it improves airflow but the best gains are to be had with an aftermarket computer and a full system.
     
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  3. tx that's pretty helpful, that seems like a bag of cat's right there but from my relatively quick read through it seems as though 83 DB ((seems a little low for a motorcycle)) is the highest acceptable limit allowed but is that at idle, start up or what exactly =S am i correct or did i miss something in my hurry to read through this thing ?
     
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  4. a lil more digging on the WA transport site has revealed some more specific's so for anybody out there looking for a number to hit it's **94 DB**

    the relevant law's can be found here:

    http://www.slp.wa.gov.au/pco/prod/FileStore.nsf/Documents/MRDocument:23719P/$FILE/RoadTrfcVhleStandRu2002-01-b0-01.pdf?OpenElement

    find ur way to page 88
    drop to: Division 3 ----; Noise emissions
    under: 144 Stationary noise levels ----; car-type vehicles and motor bikes
    and motor trikes
    (2) The stationary noise level of a car-type vehicle or motor bike or
    motor trike, must not exceed ----;
    (a) for a car-type vehicle built after 1982 ----; 90 dB(A);
    (b) for another car-type vehicle ----; 96 dB(A);
    (c) for a motor bike or motor trike built after February
    1985 ----; 94 dB(A); or

    (d) for another motor bike or motor trike ----; 100 dB(A)

    if i've gotten something wrong correct me please
     
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  5. They sound horrible! Makes it sound like a Harley...
     
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  6. If your bike was built to comply with an ADR, any modifications you make to it must also comply with the same ADR (or a later version of the same ADR).

    Many people would know how new bikes sound more or less like sewing machines... That's because the current ADR references the current UNECE standard, which stipulates a ridiculously low value (I can't remember what it is, off the top of my head, but it's in the 70's dB(A) ). Because of this, people with after market pipes are generally lucky that the police know stuff-all about all the different (and conflicting) vehicle standards, and they generally enforce the state Vehicle Standards. This allows people who have bikes which are supposed to be seventy-something dB(A) to get away with having pipes that go up to 94 dB(A), even though it isn't actually legal for those bikes.

    All of this being said, cops applying the state Vehicle Standards works against people in other ways, where the ADRs are more lenient than the state laws. Note, however, that the state laws have a "deemed to comply" clause which says that vehicles that comply with the ADRs comply with the state regs by default. Unfortunately, the plod doesn't always take notice of this part of the law, and they do "canary" perfectly legal ADR compliant bikes - especially in NSW, so I've heard.
     
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  7. personally i think the termi's sound better but also cost 3 times the price & are in the way of the rear, with the boom tubes a lot of thing's have to go right for them to sound right, power commander, dyno tuning & a lil bit of luck but why i'm really interested in them is the nice clean tail they leave on the Ducati Monster 1100 EVO & how it allows the eye's to better recognise awesomeness of the SSSA

    throw a rock & it'll land on some legally sacred government protected fern or bush, i'm sick to death of all this political bull shit the Australian government keeps shoveling down the public's throat honestly you'd think the descendants of convict's would be a lil more unruly ehh ?

    from a legal standpoint if i had to defend myself in the courts i'd just cite the above passage & argue any conflicting passages of law within other legal doctorates simply muddy's & cloud's the water for the average joe, it probably wouldn't stand out but i'm sure a real lawyer would be able to tear it a new ass no ?
     
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  8. The fines would be upheld, and you'd also have to pay court costs. To the legal fraternity, it's clear cut: if your bike was built to comply with the ADRs, then it must continue to comply with the ADRs that were in effect at the time that the bike was built. If your bike was built before the ADRs existed (or if you'd applied to your state's vehicle registering body for an exemption to the ADRs and had the exemption granted - unlikely to happen), then the state Vehicle Standards would apply.

    Fortunately, regarding exhaust noise, police officers usually don't know the details of the ADRs, or they would send more of us to the EPA for noise testing.
     
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