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Bike wont start, please help

Discussion in 'Maintenance and Servicing' at netrider.net.au started by Hobo, Dec 18, 2007.

  1. im a new rider and i drop myvtr250 while practicing slow speed tight u turns. it wasnt dropped hard. after i got it back up, i tried to start up again, but engine wont start. pls help. :cry:

    Thanks


     
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  2. um have you checked the kill switch? Don't be embarrassed if it is clicked off, we have all done it. Oh except me of course :grin:
     
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  3. it hit the engine stop switch while i was on my side, i did the usual start engine routine, Ignition on, stop switch to Run, clutch in, press starter button but all i hear is a few clicks :?
     
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  4. You've flooded it - happens when you drop it.

    Hold the throttle wide open and hold the starter down. Hold it down for about 5 seconds, then let it sit for 10 seconds or so before trying again, repeat as necessary until it staggers into life.

    Alternatively if you leave it for a few hours the fuel should drain down by itself and then it will start.
     
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  5. You need to be very careful - the VTR250 can flood the combustion chamber with engine oil when it tips over.

    Please remove the sparkplugs and attempt to "start" the engine. Does it turn over? Be careful, if it has oiled up you will get a stream of oil ejected from the plug holes.

    Here is a link to a thread where this happened at the beginning of the week:

    https://netrider.net.au/forums/viewtopic.php?t=46361&start=15

    If the engine won't turn over with the plugs out you have most probably flattened the battery. Since the light is on when the key is on this is not hard to do. Charge the battery, pull the plugs and try again.

    All the best

    Trevor G
     
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  6. Hi,

    How can you get all of the oil out of the combustion chamber? I've removed the plugs and cleaned the oil off them. I've turned the engine over multiple times, on the first occasion a stream of oil exited each chamber. On subsequent occasions, less oil comes out. I've put the plugs back in twice, on each occasion the engine turns over but the will not fire. There is still oil in the chamber getting on to the end of the plug resulting in no spark.

    Thanks,
    Simon
     
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  7. When you have the plugs out and turn the engine can you see them spark?
     
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  8. Sounds like maybe a flooded engine :/
     
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  9. Do I have this right,this thread appears to start 9 years ago.
     
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  10. I wonder if they are still stuck there.

    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQ56XydXdD0J3Tgie99AVv9GrYcaHvNq3o9Z7WYz88n4zJ5vaT5OIu-j8w8PQ.
     
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  11. That's what I thought until I looked at Op. A new person to NR with same problem as person 9 years ago. Must have come up in a GOOGLE search. Unfortunately link to old solution not working.

    simonmacphersonsimonmacpherson welcome to NR. I suggest you post an introduction in the Welcome lounge Welcome Lounge and then also outline your problem again.
     
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  12. @SNES: I'll check the plugs this evening.

    If old threads are not closed, there is always a chance someone may comment on them.
     
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  13. Yup, but that's why we don't throw them away, one mans junk is another man's treasure.
     
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  14. No spark on the plugs when I turn the engine over.
     
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  15. You did place or earth the side of the plug on the frame to 'ground' it when you tested for spark?? If you just hang it in the air on the plug lead, you wont get a spark, but you might get a shock :]
     
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  16. If after all this time it's still not starting, it's unlikely to be flooding.

    So, did you drop the bike like Hobo did way back in 2007 or did you rock up to the bike one day and find that it just wouldn't start?

    Like Gooza said, earth the side of the plug against some major metal bit, preferably bare metal and hit the starter and see if the spark plug sparks. N.B. hold the plug by the plug cap.

    If there is no spark that's what you'll need to sort first.

    I hope you have a battery charger because the battery's going to run down if you keep turning the engine and still can't get it started.
     
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  17. After earthing the side of the plugs against the metal chassis, I do get a spark on both plugs after hitting the starter.

    I do have a battery charger.

    I dropped the bike while it was running and since then it wont start. The bike idled while on the ground for about 10 - 15 seconds and then cut out on its own volition.
     
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  18. They're sparking so you're ahead. Was it a strong spark i.e. bright and crackling? If not might be time to charge up the battery and have a go at starting her up again.

    If you remove the plugs again after turning the engine vigorously, see if they're still fouling - should not be after so many days.

    If they are still sopping wet with petrol it might be the carbs - getting very near to the end of what I know how to do :(
     
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  19. Most bikes will flood if they are laid down. Most times, they will be hard to start immediately after. If the bike is let sit for a few minutes in an upright position, they will generally start with no choke and an open throttle to get it to fire, then a normal throttle position for the actual start. (mine likes a closed throttle to actually start) The open throttle moves copious air through the cylinder. This is usually enough to dry the plugs in a warm engine, and it will light up unless one drains the battery in the start attempts, (or wears out the effort available from the right leg) which weakens the spark available.

    I wouldn't read too much into it in terms of finding a defect, particularly if the bike was running normally before the fall. Worst case? Remove the plugs and turn the motor over to aerate the cylinders and/or blow the plug(s) off with compressed air, maybe even use a little air in the cylinder to assist with drying the (possibly badly) petrol soaked combustion chamber, being careful to blow out all of the crap in the spark plug well before removing the plug so that you don't blow grit into the cylinder with the air. If you have got this far, you will have probably transported the bike home and will be dealing with a cold engine, which will probably need choke to start. It is worth keeping a new spark plug (or a set) at home. Older plugs are more susceptible to fouling as they usually have some carbon deposited along the insulator from deep within the plug to the metal tip on the central electrode. This can provide an alternative path for the electricity and can significantly weaken the spark at the tip. This can be cleaned with a bit of fine wire to scratch it off and blown out with compressed air, but is often not deemed worth the bother. When in doubt, fit the new plug(s).

    It is not unusual for someone to immediately try for a start immediately after a drop. Bikes don't usually cooperate well. As has been said before, check to ensure your kill switch is in the right position. Don't be in a hurry. If you crank the engine too long straightaway on the flooded engine, you can deplete the battery to where the spark available will be weak. This complicates the problem. Usually waiting a few minutes before attempting a start will restore your carburettor float levels and no new fuel will enter the cylinder so long as you leave the choke alone, which you should do, while the engine is still hot. I wouldn't go looking for actual defects after a simple drop. Don't try to "fix" what aint broke!

    Yeah, I know, ancient OP. Still, if this can help someone, there it is. I agree with Mcsenna.
     
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  20. It was a strong spark. They are new plugs. The battery is also new.

    The plug ends are not wet with petrol, the ends are soaked with oil (as originally reported), which is occurring when the engine is turned over and I suspect is resulting in little or no spark. I've evacuated as much oil as I can from both chambers by turning the engine over after removing the plugs - the oil is not streaming out as it was initially but there must still be excess oil present in the chambers. If I can get it started this should burn off after a few minutes.
     
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