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Bike stand

Discussion in 'Technical and Troubleshooting Torque' at netrider.net.au started by Riderman, Jun 1, 2011.

  1. Hi team,

    I'd like to change my own oil and perform my own maintenance.

    What stand do you have, and which would you recommend? Do I need front and rear, or rear only (for oil changes, chain lubrication etc)?



    I see plenty on eBay but question the build quality of non-branded items.

    Thanks.
     
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  2. I just bought a headlift & rear stand for $135 plus postage with a choice of spool size and a set of 5 size pins. Got the stands within a few days and couldnt be happier. Quality seems good, at the end of the day these things are simple stuff and pretty much just a bunch of metals welded together so an unbranded one would be just as good as the branded one (maybe youd get cleaner welds, shinier metals, and better wheels for the branded ones but nothing that really sets it apart).

    Oh I forgot to mention the spool size when I bought mine, so the guy just guessed and guessed wrong, he personally delivered another set of spools the next day........I also had the chance to admire his beautiful red Ducati. Top service.

    http://cgi.ebay.com.au/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=260698054193&ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT

    For an oil change and chain lube youd only really need a rear.......but $80 for rear v $135 for both isnt much of a difference. Anyway youd have a hell of a time trying to change tyres and fix your suspension with just one stand at the back.
     
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  3. Thanks asian cruiser,

    That's fine because I plan to leave the sussy and tyre (serious stuff) to the mechanics, thanks for that link - how do I find out what spool size I need?
     
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  4. I found mine on the internet, just googled spool and the bike.......mine needed an 8mm and tapping.
     
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  5. you can use your centre stand for the oil chanes, well atleast thats what i did
     
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  6. If you have a centre stand that is.

    Have been looking at some different ways to lift a bike as I need to fit a lowering kit and the spools solution will not work as I need to take the weight off the swingarm.

    There is a good few vids on you tube - one where a guy slides a box under one side of his sump and another on the other side once he's levered it up on the first box. Nice tightwad solution I thought.
     
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  7. leaned mine up against a wall, securely of course, then did me oil/filter change, easy.
    but stand would be handy for chain cleans
     
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  8. I bought an off-brand Chinese stand for $100. It's a pretty simple thing, hard to go wrong. The good stands will just have less flex, and more strength, so you'd be happy to sit on your bike while it's on the stand. If you're any good as a welder (or know someone who is), you could probably make a much stronger (and uglier) one yourself.
     
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  9. Have you tried a jack stand under each footpeg? Lift the back with a rear stand (or a mate), position the stands under the pegs, then lower the bike onto them.

    Works fine for aftermarket pegs, but most stockies you can just turn upside down in the bracket so they don't fold up.
     
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  10. I've been looking for some sort of bike stand for a couple days, something I can get decent height on after I wrecked my back bending over or sitting on the ground installing the heel-toe and battery connector bajigger. Those little racey stands don't seem to add much height, hydraulics lifts are thousands of dollars. Seems best bet is a bench type thing with a ramp. Found one on one of the linked sites, but it was $400 for a bloody bench!
     
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  12. The best thing would be one of those foot operated hydraulic stands. I think it would be easy enough to knock one up if you could source a jack or two for a reasonable price. The one thing I've learned in all the playing around I've done with bikes and cars is that you always get what you pay for. Cheap solutions are rarely good ones.
     
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