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automatic bikes

Discussion in 'Bike Reviews, Questions and Suggestions' at netrider.net.au started by fossil, Mar 4, 2007.

  1. Hi riders,
    Got a question and don't laugh, I have my reasons for asking.
    Is anyone aware of a bike (not scooter) available in Australia that has automatic gear changes or similar (ie something easier than the conventional clutch lever and foot pedal setup).
    I'm aware of a manufacturer in the US named Ridley but I do not see anyone selling their bikes in Oz. I saw a recent article about an Aprilia 850 called a Mana but who knows if it'll ever make it to Australia.
    Any insights would be greatly appreciated.
    Cheers


     
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  2. Probably not what you're after, but there is the FJR 1300 clutch less released last year Click here
     
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  3. Well depends on how much you want to waste on the bike, you'll be able to make any bike into a auto.
     
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  4. Thanks for the responses. Pretty limited range by the looks of it.
    Cleverlie's comment interests me. Is it really possible to make any bike automatic? I would imagine that would be a bit messy and expensive. Anyway, thanks for the replies. If anything else comes to mind I'd like to hear about it.
    Cheers
     
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  5. If she's looking for auto, she may aswell look at scooters cause converting any bike into an auto would be so ridiculously expensive it wouldn't be worth doing, unless money was no object.
     
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  6. Any chance of telling us why?
    there is a system that can be put on bikes that makes the gear change as easy as the push of a botton.

    theres a company in WA that specialise in moding things for people with a disability, cars, bikes, boats, etc
     
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  7. Aprilia Mana is due for release in AUS about now.

    Has a CVT gearbox with Rain/Economy/Sport profiles.

    no clutch lever at all; can be used with foot pedal shift or full auto.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
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  8. Automatic bike, seems to defeat the purpose somewhat..

    I know you're saying no scooters, but I'd definately consider one, especially alot of the new hybrids. They often look very much like bikes, but with a more comfy seat and luggage space. Can get moderately powerful ones now too.
     
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  9. Any idea what the + button is for?

    I like the idea of a CVT where you can set the rev point as you ride. Maybe that is what the + button is for.
     
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  10. So I reckon the + button would be for the 'sequential gear change'...
     
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  11. Yeah just had a rummage through their website. I couldn't see anything on weight.

    They did for the 750. I assume it's a conventional gear change.

    So regardless of the CVT aprilia are bringing out modern 750 and 850 twins at what I presume will be reasonable prices.

    sounds interesting.

    Oh, and as to the original question I Know Honda brought out a 2 speed auto cb750(i think) in the 70s in the US. Others may have also.

    But really why bother. Changing gears on a bike is much more instinctive then a car, so unless you have a problem where you can't, then just learn.
     
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  12. I have the FJR1300AE, and it's bloody awesome, takes a bit of time to get the hang of the clutch engaging at slow speeds but you can actually ride the bike one handed if you want, the FJR has the shift on the left hand bar and also the normal gear shift at the foot.

    http://www.yamaha-motor.com.au/motor/prod_detail.asp?MD_ID=264&modelcatid=2
     
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  13. Indeed they did. http://www.cvmg-gpr.ca/hondamatic/

    Ring up a dealer in the US and ask for one, most of them were never sold, so you may just score a new one!!!! :LOL:
     
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  14. its called a DNA or something its technicily a scotter (cause its atomotic) but i though i was a bike first few times i saw it. Call bike biz in parramata they will know its full name.
     
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  15. Here's a little copy/paste for you, I'd say that there is one on the right side bar with a negative sign on it for downshifting and the pictured one is upshifts.

    -----------------------------
    The headline is obviously that this is a revolutionary automatic motorcycle, built with Aprilia's and parent Piaggio's extensive experience of CVT transmissions.

    The CVT system is a belt and variable diameter pulley system that provides an infinite number of gear ratios, making the bike smooth and very easy to ride. It also has some performance advantages and it will satisfyingly out drag almost anything (including top of the range sports bikes) from the traffic lights.

    Aprilia have set up the CVT with three automatic settings and a pseudo sequential seven speed manual. The auto settings are touring (for good economy), sport (for maximum performance) and rain (for a softer power delivery for good traction in the wet), and they are interchangeable on the move with a handlebar switch. The pseudo manual option is controlled also via the handlebars (see pic) or through the traditional left foot selector. There is no clutch lever.

    The commuter is clearly in Aprilia's sights here, with a bike that is easy to ride and well suited to town riding, but also has the convenience of a helmet storage in the false fuel tank, with the airbox being moved to between and to the left of the v-twin cylinders and the real fuel tank to under the seat.

    The engine is a torquey, easily maintained and economical 90° v twin developed initially by parent Piaggio's engine department with 75bhp and 56lbft, single overhead cams, a dry sump and stainless steel exhaust.

    The frame is a rigid tubular steel trellis design that should make the bike handle like an Aprilia should.

    The front end is chunky 43mm upside down forks with radial brakes, steel braided lines and 320mm discs.

    The rear has an aluminium swing arm with the shock absorber moved to one side to allow for a shorter, faster turning wheelbase.

    ----------------------------------

    :cool:
     
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  17. There was also the Moto Guzzi Convert which had an auto box.

    There is one for sale in one of those trader bike magazines this month (can't remember which one and can't be bothered searching for the advert :)
     
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  19. I honestly cant remember the last time i used a clutch other than to take off at the lights :p
     
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