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Almost came off

Discussion in 'New Riders and Riding Tips' at netrider.net.au started by Milpool, Jun 6, 2016.

  1. So yesterday I was in a corner on clear mountain road (I'm sure the Brisbane people will know this road) and noticed a dirt patch. I didn't really think much of it as I'd seen enough videos of people freaking out, slamming on brake and ending in a crash; but when I hit it, I lost grip then got speed wobbles. I maintained throttle through it instead of hitting brakes and stayed light on handlebars which I understand is possibly the reason I didn't actually come off. It did go through my whole body though, my right legged kicked out and then slammed back down on the foot peg leaving me with some pain and a nice lump.



    Basically I just need to know how to avoid this in future. It scared the shit out of me and is the first time since I started riding about four months ago that I was convinced I was about to come off.
     
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  2. It sounds like you did pretty well there mate. The initial (and quite often wrong) reaction in these situations is to brake, which you didn't do. Maintaining a smooth line I think is important.

    How was your positioning pre corner, could you have avoided the patch with a different vision, or line into the corner, or was it hidden to a point at corner entry? TO me, the only way to avoid a situation like that is to ensure that you are looking as far through the corner as is possible and choosing a line that suits best.
     
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  3. good work, have been caught unawares by road debris myself, I think all riders have at some stage. RussellDPRussellDP is correct in looking ahead and maintaining a steady throttle and a good line will help in these situations but they can still be quite scary.
     
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  4. Thanks for the help and encouragement there. The annoying thing is I don't remember much aside from the speed wobbles, it just took me completely by surprise. You're definitely right about looking through corners; it's proving a tough habit to get into but I do remind myself as a often as possible, not often enough yet though haha.
     
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  5. Sometimes despite ones best efforts, you will have to ride over something you really shouldn't. Besides not responding in any way with the controls at your disposal as you did (brakes, throttle, steering....), I find that very loud swearing and but clenching helps to lift the bike into the air space inhabited by the angels.
     
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  6. yeah best practice is to not hit the sh1t in the first place, but when that is unavoidable then go to plan B
     
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  7. The best example of being in a corner and finding gravel was over 40 years ago. I was coming into a right hand corner at a great rate when right in the middle of the corner was a trench that had gravel from one side of the road to the other. Where the gravel was I lift the bike up a bit and as so as I was over the gravel put it down hard into the corner. I can still remember it well so it got the heart rate up.
     
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  8. It sounds like you did really well mate.
    What EricEric said above is probably the only other way to try and remove some lean angle and then turn in a bit more.

    But that and avoiding it are not always possible.
     
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  9. How to avoid it? You did approximately the right thing so it might be fun or amusing next time. You'll be more confident next time too. Shit happens so know how to react and don't worry about it.
     
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  10. You stayed upright. That's the best possible outcome.
    Well done MilpoolMilpool
     
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  11. Great job keeping upright. On a ride a while ago I was hitting it comfortably hard in a beautiful left hander and hit the brakes when I saw a rider down on the side of the road. And then I hit what he must have hit. A really sharp pothole that came up the forks and the bars so hard I nearly let go. Lucky I'd taken enough speed off. Wonder how I would have handled it if I hadn't been slowing down. It taught me what to practice more.
     
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  12. Well done on not coming off. But please, please - you have to look through corners (or vanishing point and beyond), you have to have as much advance warning of shit as possible. Force that to become a habit, look where you want to go...
     
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  13. Thought about doing that road myself on Sunday. Figured it would have washouts so I stuck to some less twisty roads but faster. Winn Rd was very quiet at 8am.
    Well done on keeping upright.
     
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  14. Observation and anticipation is the only way to avoid these. For a lot of corners you learn where the dirt/gravel collects (unfortunately often near our apex) and become careful. Advanced roadcraft is about giving yourself an out when it happens (Wish I was good at it) but sometimes you have to ride it out like you did. Scrub of speed and stand the bike up asap is a good response.
     
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  15. Yeah, it's one thing I am struggling to remember as a learner rider and I did get reminded of it on my test as well. I understand the importance and I am getting better it's just getting there where it all becomes instinctual.

    I should have done Winn myself, I've done clear mountain a few times but forgot just how bad the quality of the road is there. Also I was way more worried about the wind getting me on the little 250 but in comparison that was nothing haha.
     
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  16. Well that depend on on the approach though, doesn't it. If you're hard into the corner and drop speed and stand bike up you stand a good chance of landing up in the oncoming lane. And in a blind corner that is possibly the worst result you could get, depending on whether or not something suddenly appears coming the other way. No problem when vision is good and clear for other side or road for a good distance, but blind corner pop up - no thanks.
     
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  17. Alternative is to slide across the oncoming lane on your side?
     
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  18. Alternative is to see the dirt and react prior.

    I hear what you're saying, but the pop up in a blind corner (and I did mention at speed, obviously not an issue at lower speed), is not good.
     
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