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Advanced cornering

Discussion in 'New Riders and Riding Tips' at netrider.net.au started by doop, Sep 23, 2015.

  1. hi guys, noob question for an experienced rider.. currently on a gsr 600 ... which is more of a sport or sit up bike than a super sport and im still perfecting my positioning... have been reading some info on correct body position vs counter steering... some tutorials suggest one or the other... i am currently getting a good hang of the bike in serious corners and just counter steering on the easy ones..



    so my question, (its been some time since i did the rider bros knee down course).. is when leaning off the bike, what should you be doing on the front handle bars? should i be doing some counter steering? steering normally (like you would a push bike) or just be using my body weight to turn the bike.

    cheers guys
     
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  2. The bike wont turn without counter steering - period. It might waver a little if you lean far enough, but it aint possible to go round any real corner without counter steering.

    You just don't realise your doing it.
     
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  3. im not disagreeing with you but wouldnt you always have front chicken strips if that were the case? thanks for the reply
     
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  4. Counter steering doesnt mean turning the front wheel, it means push on the bar so the bike leans over.

    Have a look at Twist of the Wrist 2 video. Guy was basically standing on just 1 peg, and bike did little more than deviate a little of course.

    Have a look through the forum, lots of threads on counter steering. But again, your already doing it most likely without knowing it.
     
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  5. I would say most street (non track) riders do have front chicken strips.
     
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  6. Go do super bike school level 1
     
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  7. Can you explain this more??? I don't understand what you're getting at.

    There is no hanging off versus counter steering argument for anyone who understands steering a bike.

    The ONLY purpose of hanging off is to allow the bike to remain more upright as you go around a corner. The more you lean, the less the bike will. Check out the cornering series/resources.

    The ONLY way to effectively steer a bike is put forward pressure/forward input on the left grip or the right grip. This is called countersteering, now being known in some quarters as positive steering (to get away from the confusion caused by the term countersteering).

    You can do both at the same time. You can do the second without the first. You can't do the first only and expect to get around a corner.
     
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  8. I agree with the twist of the wrist advice. They give a good example of why this and other positions don't work
     
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  9. thanks guys... forget i said that rob .. just thinking out loud :)
     
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  10. Anyone telling you that your body positioning somehow makes the bike turn, is a fool. Stay away from them!
    Initiating a counter-steer is the only way you can get a bike to change direction. (As has been said above)
    push left go left, push right go right. That is a fundamental rule.
     
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  11. As stated previously. The amount you hang off only affects the amount of lean the bike needs to make the turn, the input into the bars is the same just less is needed to tip the bike on its ear if your hanging off compared to riding on top. Hang off, Counter steer (Push the inside bar forward), when you see the exit gently pick the throttle up and roll it on then when the corner is finished push the outside bar forward to stand the bike up. You only need to make 2 inputs into the bars to get through a turn. Takes a lot of practice to get that down pat though but that's what you need to aim for.
    Good throttle application will hold the bike on its line. Also don't try to hard just ride and enjoy
     
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  12. quick break up of how i been taught, hope it helps, anyone feel free to correct me /add stuff

    say you are going around a blind left hander where you can't see your exit

    1. set your speed (by braking & rolling of the throttle
    2. counter steer into the turn and then LET GO OF THE BARS....you will then start to fall into the turn
    3. hold your throttle (don't roll it off, or you will start to run wide) mainting a 50/50 weight transfer
    4. you can adjust your steering while holding or checking the throttle with further counter steering input if required (keep maintaining the 50/50 weight transfer by holding the throttle)
    4. See your exit point and (keep your grip loose on the bars the whole time, let them drop, very important!!!)
    3. crack the throttle and roll it on smoothly and evenly out of the turn (mainting a 60/40 weight transfer on the rear tyre)

    hope this helps

    body position is a whole other thing to add once you have mastered the process above
     
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  13. Let go of the what?
     
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  14. Take your weight grip of the handle bars once steering input has been completed
     
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  15. Letting go of the bar and stopping your input into the bar by returning back to a neutral pressure are very different things.
     
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  16. Track riding with a PB at the island of 1:49 I still have 5mm or so on the front tyre. Nothing on the rear. And FWIW hanging off your bike around corners of course has the effect of keeping the bike more upright and therefore preserving the 'chicken strips'
     
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  17. And 2 and 3, I've done 1 & 2 and will book in for 3 early next year.
     
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  18. I only lean off the bike so i don't have so far to fall
     
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    • Funny Funny x 4
  19. Street only riders will most likely have bigger chicken strips than track riders. Although I've seen some street riders get to some very low angles. Front tyres are a different shape to the rear tyres and so will have more chicken strips.
     
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  20. Senator17Senator17 So you disagreed with my post then effectively reinforced it in yours?

    Thanks.
     
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