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[US]Motorcycle ABS, no statistically significant reduction in fatalities.

Discussion in 'Research, Studies, and Data' started by robsalvv, Apr 23, 2012.

  1.  
    alan55

    alan55 Member

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Peterborough, South Australia
    Motorbike(s):
    1999 Honda ST1100ABS
    I thought I might add that Honda released the ST1100 in 1990.
    1992 saw the addition of the ST1100A which had ABS fitted. It may or may not have had traction control fitted.
    1996 Honda upgraded the braking system on the ST1100A model by fitting three piston calipers and the worlds first linked braking system on a production bike.

    I have the 1999 ST1100A which also has traction control fitted. Again this may have been fitted to earlier models but I have yet to find that out. The traction control system uses the rear wheel ABS sensor to detect rear wheel spin and thereby reducing throttle.

    In the six years I've had the bike I've never accelerated hard enough to acivate the traction control. Note that on the ST1300A this was no longer available. On the 1100's this system can be turned on/off manually.

    For memory I think the ABS activated maybe twice in six years. Once when a car entered a three laned road (80kph limit) from the left and went straight to the centre lane (my lane) and not the left lane.



    The second time was a bull/cow which decided to cross the road in front off me. I was watching it and slowed accordingly but not much you can do except avoid and brake as required. The joys of riding on some roads in WA..lol

    Linked brakes may be a problem for some but for me it's not. Most of the braking force is as usual on the front wheel. Handbrake uses outer 2 outer pistons on the two front calipers and centre piston on the rear. Foot brake use the rest (2 outer on rear and centre of each front).

    Just curious has to the generally lower US urban speed limits compared to ours might reflect in some of these figures which may not prevent the accident but reduce the severity.
  2.  
    Spocky
    Yeehaw

    Spocky Dr G Premium Member

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    • Like Like x 2
  3.  
    robsalvv

    robsalvv -MA Bronze onroad Coach- Moderator

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    Geddafuggoutahere! Good work Spocky. I'm half way through an email exchange with NHTSA trying to get the paper myself!

    No wonder the searches came up a miss... it's not even filed under it's own name!

    The last page is interesting!

    I'll read the whole lot properly when I get a chance...
  4.  
    GreyBM

    GreyBM Premium Member

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    The major downside of ABS is that bikes in TAC ads wouldn't be able to lay as much rubber in their skid marks.

    I suspect despite various findings, the studies are still looking at relatively few numbers and in totally diffferent sets of uncontrolled circumstances.

    Further irrespective of findings ABS is likely to creep into more and more bikes as a non-optional standard.
  5.  
    robsalvv

    robsalvv -MA Bronze onroad Coach- Moderator

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    LOL at Grey :)

    Interestingly, an ABS'd bike will only have a slightly better decelleration rate from a pure rear panic stomp brake than a skidding wheel.


    I finally got put in contact with the study author.
  6.  
    Spocky
    Yeehaw

    Spocky Dr G Premium Member

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    Depends how that converts to stopping distance which is the actual issue in this.

    The study author will be wondering why her paper is suddenly so popular!

    Cheers Spocky

    Damn gotta read that paper still....
  7.  
    robsalvv

    robsalvv -MA Bronze onroad Coach- Moderator

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    I guess my subtle point was that in regards to the current TAC advert, the braking and crash scenario would be pretty much the same with an ABS bike, probably colliding at a few less km/h. The bit that would be believable however, is that the riders bike will remain upright, unlike the one in the ad which skidded for almost two seconds with a locked wheel and didn't get out of shape.

    HIGHLY.
    UNLIKELY.
  8.  
    GreyBM

    GreyBM Premium Member

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    I am no engineer/physicist but I assume that a activating ABS would cause the bike to stop slower than a bike that was braking to but not past the limits of its traction. However

    (a)some riders may not push to the limit of traction for fear of exceeding it (I think from memory this was an explanation given for ABS beating some "experienced" riders in braking tests.

    (b)ABS taking a longer distance will in some cases be better than locking up and going down

    At the end of the day we are only saying what we already know.

    ABS will win on some days and be worse on others depending on all the circumstances.
  9.  
    PatB

    PatB Premium Member

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    And whether it is an overall potential benefit to an individual rider is highly dependent on how much of their riding time happens on the days when the ABS is more likely to beat the human.

    Which is why we should have the choice.
  10.  
    robsalvv

    robsalvv -MA Bronze onroad Coach- Moderator

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    Goddam nod button has disappeared again, but that post deserves a nod Pat!
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